Computer Problems And Solutions


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How to possibly fix a PC that will turn on but will not beep and will not display anything on screen
WARNING: NEVER PLACE ANY COMPUTER COMPONENT ON A METAL SURFACE! I sadly repeat an error in this video where I place computer components on the metal chassis of my computer case: THIS IS AN ERROR ON MY PART! PLACE THE COMPONENT EITHER ON A NON-CONDUCTIVE SURFACE SUCH AS WOOD OR NON-SHINY CARDBOARD, OR PLACE THE COMPONENT IN AN ESD-SAFE ANTI-STATIC PACKAGING WHEN NOT INSTALLED IN YOUR SYSTEM.

WARNING – I will NOT be held responsible for any damages the methods shown in this video may cause to yours or someone else’s computer, hardware, software, and/or data, including loss of use of such devices and/or loss of data and/or loss of profits from the resulting inability to use such devices and data. Any information or program you choose to put into use from this video is done AT YOUR OWN RISK. As a precaution, I recommend backing up any irrecoverable data before practicing any of the methods shown in this video.

This video will show you how to possibly fix a desktop personal computer that, when the power chassis button is pressed, powers up, the lights turn on, the fans spin, the hard drive and optical drives spin up, the connected devices such as USB receive power, but NO image, writing or text appears on the screen and NO POST beep error / message codes can be heard (essentially, the computer does not enter POST and boot the operating system from the initial bootup procedure that allows you to access the BIOS).

Typically, the CMOS (the component that governs which components are connected to your motherboard and how they interoperate between each other) has become confused and needs to be cleared AND / OR two or more incompatible components are present and have developed a conflict with one another and have to be switched or replaced AND / OR one or more components have gone bad (become faulty) and have to be replaced. This video will show you methods to go about diagnosing these problems.

Beep error codes differ from one BIOS manufacturer to the next. To discover what the beep error code is trying to telling you, discover the manufacturer of your BIOS (available in the motherboard’s manual or on the motherboard’s manufacturer’s website {on the page for your specific motherboard model}) and then look up the frequency and interval of your beep error code on:

http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm

If this is new hardware that you are installing on your motherboard (that you have not yet got to work on your motherboard,) note that matching bus types of video card to motherboard socket (for example, both motherboard socket and graphic card are PCI-E 16X) or matching bus types of RAM module to motherboard socket (for example, both motherboard socket and RAM module are DDR3) does not necessarily signify compatibility. If this is the first time you are trying this hardware on your motherboard, there is a chance that this new hardware is not compatible with your motherboard, despite the same bus type and despite the fact that the new parts fit in their respective motherboard socket. Your motherboard manufacturer’s website will have a support page dedicated to your motherboard’s model, and on this support page should be a compatibility list for such components as video cards and RAM modules. Ensure that your new component is certified to function with your motherboard, and if your new component is not present on the compatibility list, then there is a chance that the component is not compatible with your motherboard.

If, on the other hand, this is a component that has already functioned on this motherboard but no longer functions, let me know.

If your computer powers on but for a mere second or two and then immediately powers down, It sounds like your motherboard is developing a short circuit due to contact with the metal casing. Most likely it has to do with the screws and metal mounting stands (supports) that your motherboard sits on. The cheapest way to fix this problem is to introduce cardboard washers between the screws and where they make contact to the motherboard, or you can buy plastic mounting supports at a computer shop.

Alternatively, you can always Breadboard it: 1)place the motherboard with CPU+Fan on wood or non-shiny cardboard 2)connect all of the case connectors to the board’s panel 3)with a power bar that is OFF connect the PC power cable from the power bar to the power supply and the power supply to the board 4)while NEVER touching any exposed component,power on the power bar and press the power switch on the case.If the problem still persists,one of the remaining components is probably defective.Power off the power bar before dismantling

I cover breadboarding in greater detail in this video:


If the steps in this video did not provide a solution to your problem, view my:

You never know, maybe rebuilding the PC in the opposite sense that you took it apart will solve the problem.